frank's blog

Make a Bike. Make a Difference.

Posted in design, ideas, web by aldorf on March 14, 2012

The Bicycle Academy

A place to learn how to make bikes. You keep the skills, your first bike goes to someone who really needs it.

The Bicycle Academy is a new enterprise providing people with the skills and facilities to design and make their own bikes.

Frame building will be taught by the legendary Brian Curtis as evening classes or short weekday courses. As part of the learning process each student will make a frame designed specifically for use in Africa. Once graduated students will be able to use The Bicycle Academy workshop to hone their skills and build their own frames. (Sponsored via peoplefund.it)

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Fantastic Animatronics Reel by John Nolan

Posted in Animation, art, film by aldorf on May 31, 2011

Kudos John Nolan for an impressive reel here! This is incredible craftsmanship.

Imagination underpins every uniquely human achievement. Imagination led us from caves to cities, from bone clubs to golf clubs, from carrion to cuisine, and from superstition to science.The relationship between imagination and “reality” is both complicated and profound. (The Element).

Watch Reel Here.

The art of “Karakuri”. Japan has always been on the forefront of cutting edge robotics. Its roots can be traced back 200-300 years during the Edo period when skilled craftsmen created automata (self-operating machines). Using nothing more than pulleys and weights they were able to make the Karakuri (Japanese automata) perform amazing tasks.
Japans modern day robots can be traced back to the Karakuri. Today Hideki Higashino is one of the few remaining craftsmen who is determined to keep the history and tradition of Japanese Karakuri alive. (video here)

Think Quarterly – New Online Magazine by Google

Posted in blog, ideas, inspiration, Media by aldorf on March 24, 2011

Google has quietly launched its own full-length online magazine, a quarterly publication whose aim is to create a “breathing space in a busy world.”

The first edition of Think Quarterly, based out of the U.K., is a 68-page dive into the world of data and its impact on business. The first thing most people will notice is that it’s a visually stunning piece of work. It’s a rich Flash app with Google’s quirky sensibilities and the in-depth writing you might find in BusinessWeek or Salon. Google’s quarterly magazine is edited and designed by creative agency The Church of London.

The articles themselves are thought pieces about major business and technology topics from a variety of freelancers and contributors. Google was able to snag Simon Rogers (editor of The Guardian‘s Datablog), Ulrike Reinhard (editor of WE Magazine), and other journalists for the project. Many of Think Quarterly‘s articles feature interviews with Google executives and technology leaders. Some of the people featured include Vodafone U.K. CEO Guy Laurence, Google chief economist Hal Varian and famed psychologist Peter Kruse.

“At Google, we often think that speed is the forgotten ‘killer application’ – the ingredient that can differentiate winners from the rest,” Matt Brittin, Google’s managing director of U.K. and Ireland operations, said in Think Quarterly‘s introduction. “We know that the faster we deliver results, the more useful people find our service.

“But in a world of accelerating change, we all need time to reflect. Think Quarterly is a breathing space in a busy world. It’s a place to take time out and consider what’s happening and why it matters.”

It’s unclear whether the new online magazine is another sign that Google is entering the media business or whether it’s just a project to feed the company’s intellectual curiosity. Google doesn’t describe its newest project as a magazine or a publication. Instead, Google calls it a book on its website and a “unique communications tool” on its Twitter account.

Regardless of what you call it, Think Quarterly is an interesting and informative experiment by the search giant.

(via Mashable)

Astonishing – Speed Creating by Dominic Wilcox

Posted in art, blog, design, ideas, inspiration by aldorf on October 29, 2010

Each day for 30 consecutive days Dominic attempted to make something creative. In hope to force himself into making quick decisions, creating things instinctively. You can find an index of all 30 Days in the Speed Creating project linked to all the day’s pages here. For more information about the project visit this page. Well done, Dominic Wilcox!

Growing Knowledge : The Evolution of Research – Exhibition at British Library 10/12/2010 – 7/16/2011

Posted in ideas by aldorf on October 27, 2010

Growing Knowledge: The evolution of research. An exhibition at the British Library showcasing innovative research tools 12 October 2010 – 16 July 2011.

Crowd Accelerated Innovation – How Web Video Powers Global Innovation

Posted in ideas, innovation, inspiration, web by aldorf on October 8, 2010

TED‘s Chris Anderson says the rise of web video is driving a worldwide phenomenon he calls Crowd Accelerated Innovation — a self-fueling cycle of learning that could be as significant as the invention of print. But to tap into its power, organizations will need to embrace radical openness.

“I’m an idealist. I really think people can change the world … ” (Chris Anderson). Don’t get confused, he is not Chris Anderson who edits WIRED magazine and wrote The Long Tail. TED’s Chris Anderson was born in a remote village in Pakistan, and spent his early years in India, Pakistan and Afghanistan, where his father worked as a missionary eye surgeon. He graduated from Oxford University with a degree in philosophy, and then trained as a journalist. He became an editor at one of the UK’s early computer magazines, and a year later, in 1985, formed a tiny start-up to launch his own magazine. Its unlikely success led to more launches. Anderson expanded to the United States in 1994, where he built Imagine Media, publisher of Business 2.0 magazine, and creator of the popular games website IGN. The combined companies eventually spawned more than 100 monthly magazines, employing 2,000 people. Anderson created a private nonprofit foundation, the Sapling Foundation, which hoped to find new ways of tackling tough global issues by leveraging media, technology, entrepreneurship, and most of all, ideas. He joined TED in 2001.

Winner Of The Design Awards 2010

Posted in architecture, design by aldorf on June 13, 2010

Min-Kyu Choi‘s ‘The Folding Plug’ beat off competition from some of the biggest names in global design and architecture to be crowned winner. It is set to go into production at the end of the year. Folding Plug H 264.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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Speed Of Light Images

Posted in architecture, art, Media, photography by aldorf on June 13, 2010

Seed Cathedral by Heatherwick Studio

Posted in architecture, art by aldorf on April 16, 2010

In collaboration with other design teams Heatherwick Studio developed a design concept where the UK Pavilion explores the relationship between nature and city. After all London happens to be the greenest city of its size in the world; the UK pioneered the world’s first ever public park and the world’s first major botanical institution, the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew.  What a better way to advertize the UK with a rather unconventional approach, the Seed Cathedral.

Rage Against The Machine #1 In The U.K. This Christmas

Posted in Media, web by aldorf on December 21, 2009

Thanks to a Facebook group they made it to the very top with their ’92 single “Killing in the Name”. Power to the people. Social networking at its best. It’s possible if you are relevant. 450.000 members in just two weeks of existence. Good job. Emily Henry writes in her article “…In the campaign for Rage Against the Machine to get the Christmas No.1 spot, a salute is owed to Facebook for its ability to organize the disorganized. Simon Cowell and his music manufacturing machine have been reminded of the fact that no one man decides the fate of the music industry. It is a democratic process. “The silent majority has spoken,” said my 15-year-old brother via his Facebook status. Rage has been accomplished against the machine. At least, that’s the idea, right?…” Read the full story at huffington post.

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