frank's blog

The Importance of Brand in an Era of Digital Darwinism

Posted in ideas, innovation, internet by aldorf on March 7, 2012

Excerpts of an unpublished appendix for The End of Business as Usual… by Brian Solis

Markets, consumer behavior and how businesses connect with customers are all directly impacted by technology.

The increasingly important role of technology, combined with global economic unrest, means a company’s brand is more important today than it has ever been. Consumers, in search of certainty, rely heavily on a brand’s symbolism and significance

Digital Darwinism is the evolution of consumer behavior when society and technology evolve faster than some companies’ ability to adapt.

Babson College cited a rather humbling statistic; “Over 40% of the companies that were at the top of the Fortune 500 in 2000 were no longer there in 2010.”

24/7 Wall St. published its annual list of “Ten Brands That Will Disappear in 2012.” The publication predicts the demise of some of the world’s most recognizable brands, including Sony Pictures, American Apparel and Nokia.

“For me, marketing is about values. This is a very noisy world and we’re not going to get a chance to get people to remember much about us. So, we have to be very clear what we want them to know about us.” (Steve Jobs)

The company then looked inward in an attempt to answer the questions: Who is Apple; What does it stand for and where does the brand fit in the world.

“What we’re about isn’t making boxes for people to get their jobs done,” said Jobs during the company meeting,” Apple’s core value is that we believe people with passion can change the world…for the better. Those people, crazy enough to think that they can change the world are the ones that actually do.…Here’s to the crazy ones.”

McDonald’s is adapting to a new era, creating an experience marked by muted colors, wooden tables and faux leather chairs. And, that’s just the beginning. McDonald’s is pouring $1 billion into redesigning the consumer experience.

Everything begins with embracing a culture of innovation and adaptation — a culture that recognizes the impact of disruptive technology and how consumer preference and affinity is evolving.

If a organizations cannot recognize opportunities to further compete for attention and relevance, it cannot, by default, create meaningful connections, a desirable brand or drive shareable experiences. The brand, as a result, will lost preference in the face of consumer choice, which may one day lead to its succumbing to digital Darwinism.

Camera That Can Capture At The Speed Of Light [video]

Posted in film, innovation, photography by aldorf on January 4, 2012

A team from the MIT media lab has created a camera with a “shutter speed” of one trillion exposures per second — enabling it to record light itself traveling from one point to another. Using a heavily modified Streak Tube (which is normally used to intensify photons into electron streams), the team could snap a single image of a laser as it passed through a soda bottle. In order to create the slow-motion film in the video we’ve got after the break, the team had to replicate the experiment hundreds of times. The stop-motion footage shows how light bounces through the bottle, collecting inside the opaque cap before dispersing. The revolutionary snapper may have a fast shutter but the long time it takes to process the images have earned it the nickname of the “the world’s slowest fastest camera.” (via engadget.com)

Invoked Computing For Ubiquitous AR – Complete Change of Perspective

Posted in design, innovation, pioneers by aldorf on December 5, 2011

We currently place a lot of emphasis on the digital gadgets we own.

What if we were looking at the wrong paradigm and it’s not about the form factor or the physical object?

What if instead was all about what we wanted to do and achieve?

Welcome to the world of Invoked Computing from the University of Tokyo.

Think of the consequences…

1. All the stuff we could get rid of.
2. The environmental benefits of doing that
3. The lamented demise of the electronics product designer and product design (via Core 77)

Quantum Levitation [Video]

Posted in conference, design, innovation, pioneers, quality by aldorf on October 25, 2011

Wow that’s awesome! This video from The University of Tel-Aviv showing a disc of yttrium barium copper oxide floating due to quantum levitation. It’s pretty crazy …

 

 

Throwable Panoramic Ball Camera

Posted in ideas, Media, photography by aldorf on October 15, 2011

Throwable Panoramic Ball Camera which captures a full spherical panorama when thrown into the air. At the peak of its flight, which is determined using an accelerometer, a full panoramic image is captured by 36 mobile phone camera modules.

Patent pending. More info: http://jonaspfeil.de/ballcamera

A project of the Computer Graphics Group, TU Berlin.

To be presented as an Emerging Technologies demonstration at the SIGGRAPH Asia 2011: Jonas Pfeil, Kristian Hildebrand, Carsten Gremzow, Bernd Bickel, Marc Alexa

Just incredible! Robot flies like a bird

Posted in Animation, innovation, pioneers by aldorf on July 27, 2011

 

Absolut energy efficient. Mucho respect for these modern day Da Vinci’s at Festo!

Beautiful – MADE Berlin Project “Captured: Homage to Light and Air”

Posted in Animation, architecture, art by aldorf on June 30, 2011

A creative clash by graphic designer Sven Völker and machine artist Nils Völker.

On the Edge – Seven on Seven Event 2011 by Rhizome

Posted in Animation, art, conference, design, inspiration, Media by aldorf on June 2, 2011

Seven on Seven by Rhizome. Just Inspiring to see great collaboration between very talented people and the field of art and technology.

First video I had to watch was a collaboration between Zach Lieberman and Bre Pettis,

“Creativity, Collaboration and Hacking” – Thoughts Shared by Caterina Fake

Posted in art, conference, design, inspiration, Media, pioneers by aldorf on June 2, 2011

This was her intro to 7 on 7 – Connectin Art & Technology. Make sure to check out their event website 

(by Caterina Fake)

When I was in college, I wrote a paper about a poem, “The Book of Ephraim”, that was about a couple that spent years talking to spirits on a Ouija board, communing with the shades of poets, emperors, and friends. I’d never tried a Ouija board before, but I drew one on a piece of paper and used an overturned teacup to try it out with my friends. Amazing things happened as a result: we recorded conversations with dead army generals from Prussia who’d climbed Kilimanjaro, and conjured a mysterious spirit who spoke only in riddles. It was an addictive activity. Hours would go by, story after story would be told, and eventually the candle, set up for atmosphere, would gutter out, or we had to stop and eat, or pee, or write another paper, or go to sleep.

I didn’t believe (and I don’t think my friends believed) that we were actually talking to spirits, but something much more interesting has happening: my subconscious and the subconscious of my friend were working together to tell a story, a story we couldn’t have made up on our own, but which we were both contributing to.

If you’ve ever been in a band, or played a sport, or danced, or done anything with other people — even started a company! — you’ll know what I’m talking about. You make up a riff, and then the bass player picks up the riff, and then the drummer makes a variation on the theme, reversing it, and you jam on it and make sweet, sweet music together. Hours go by, you are lost in the flow, or the zone, or the jam, or whatever you want to call it. You know when this is happening with your hockey team, when you’re reaching a sublime level of banter at the dinner table, even when your flirting is really hitting the mark. Your subconscious is working together with someone else’s, time vanishes, peace prevails on earth, and everyone is dissolved together into the great, unimpeachable and omnipotent Is.

Hacking and art-making are like this, especially when done together — an artist-hacker matched with a hacker-artist for the day — to jam, invent, make things, do stuff, and have ideas. Both technology and art are about making things new and seeing things new, and the way to arrive at the new is a collaborative, mysterious and Ouija-like process.

This is what Seven on Seven is, and what Rhizome has created for us, here, today. It’s a risky undertaking because you pretty much have to go with your first idea. And your partner — maybe you know her, maybe you don’t. What if you are unable to get in the groove? What if you’re classical and she’s jazz? He’s Rails and She’s Python?

What’s fun about this project, this format and this day is we don’t know how it’s going to turn out. It’s a lark, a plunge. We’re in the middle of the creative process, not the end. It’s a leap-of-faith, seed-stage, put good people together and see what happens day. The seven technologists and the seven artists here today are the top of their respective fields, and they’ve hacked and improv’d their way through the past day.

The assembled awesomeness is inspiring and Lauren has set the scene, a locus for scenius. What do we have? A blank sheet of paper, a Ouija board, an overturned teacup, two people and their imaginations. Or an iPad, a keyboard, Ruby on Rails, some wires, two people and their imaginations.

And our own curiosity, amazement and surprise.

Interactive Film “ROME” – Chris Milk and Aaron Koblin Did It Again!

Posted in Uncategorized by aldorf on May 14, 2011

Experience “3 Dreams of Black” at http://www.ro.me/

“3 Dreams of Black” is Chris Milk‘s new interactive film, created in WebGL with some friends from Google, for Danger Mouse & Daniele Luppi’s ROME, featuring Jack White & Norah Jones. The project is a Chrome Experiment (http://www.chromeexperiments.com/) that showcases some of the latest web technologies in modern browsers like Google Chrome.

In building “3 Dreams of Black”, we’ve had the opportunity to build many tools, libraries, and models. We’ve fully opened up the source code and made it available for web developers to tinker with us at http://www.ro.me/tech. In addition to the code, a few other highlights include eight WebGL demos, a fun model viewer for interacting with some of the animals from the web experience, and the Three.js 3D library used for building the experience. In addition, a big part of the project was to define a good pipeline for getting all the animals and environment models right in WebGL — for this, we extended Blender with custom plugins so we could manipulate and export the data with ease.

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