frank's blog

The GOAB Concept – Integrating TV Into Your Digital Ecosystem

Posted in film, ideas, Media by aldorf on April 19, 2011

Interesting to see how we define and describe concepts in times of merging technology. Syzygy says it’s a new TV experience concept. To me it’s more taking the focus off TV and connecting it with all your other devices. Your TV becomes part of the already existing ecosystem of mobile digital tools and is one of many media surfaces. An opportunity to create more interactive content and keeping the fixed mounted screen in your living room on and alive. Reminds me of another great example by BERG, London.

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Where Amazing Happens – India. Tablet Computer For $35!

Posted in ideas, Media, web by aldorf on July 24, 2010

(photo: ap)

India’s Human Resource Development Minister Kapil Sibal this week unveiled the low-cost computing device that is designed for students, saying his department had started talks with global manufacturers to start mass production to launch in 2011.

They actually plan to subsidize the cost of the tablet for its students, to bring the purchase price down to around $20.

“This is our answer to MIT’s $100 computer,” Kapil Sibal told the Economic Times when he unveiled the device Thursday.

In 2005, Nicholas Negroponte — co-founder of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab — unveiled a prototype of a $100 laptop for children in the developing world. India rejected that as too expensive and embarked on a multiyear effort to develop a cheaper option of its own.

If the government can find a manufacturer, the Linux operatingsystem-based computer would be the latest in a string of “world’s cheapest” innovations to hit the market out of India, which is home to the 100,000 rupee ($2,127) compact Nano car, the 749 rupees ($16) water purifier and the $2,000 open-heart surgery.

(read more…)

How The Tablet Will Change the World

Posted in ideas, Media by aldorf on April 7, 2010

Window on the World

by Kevin Kelly

Don’t think of them as tablets. Think of them as windows that you carry. Two things distinguish them from always-on smartphones and lightweight laptops.

First, these are mobile screens, meant to move. They are aware of where they are in space and time. Hold a window up in front of you and you see an alternative view of the scene. Maybe you see annotated layers or a view from long ago. If someone is speaking to you through the window, move the screen and it will sweep across the caller’s room. This portable portal will peer into anything visible. You’ll be able to see into movies, pictures, rooms, Web pages, places, and books seamlessly. Many people think of this sheet as a full-color, hi-res, super ebook reader, but this viewer will be about moving images as much as text. Not just watching video but making it. It will have a built-in camera and idiot-proof video-editing tools, and it will also serve as a portble movie screen, eventually enabled for 3-D. You’ll “film” with the screen! It will remake both book publishing and Hollywood, because it creates a transmedia that conflates books and video. You get TV you read, books you watch, movies you touch.

And that is the second difference between this window and past devices: The tablet window goes two ways. You watch; it watches you. Its eye can remain on all the time, watching you as much as you like. Brian Eno once famously said (in the pages of Wired) that the problem with computers was that there was not enough Africa in them. By this he meant that computers as we knew them could “see” only the wiggling ends of our fingers as we typed. But if they could see and employ the rest of our body, as if we were dancing or singing, we could express ourselves with greater finesse. This window tablet injects some Africa into computers. It overthrows the tyranny of the keyboard. Gestures are king. Swoosh your fingers to scroll, wave your arms as with a Wii, shake or tilt it. Celebrate its embodiment. The craftsmanship of this device will matter. We’ll spend hours holding it, caressing it, stroking its magic surface, watching it. The feel of its surface, the liquidity of its flickers, the presence or lack of its warmth, the quality of its build, the temperature of its glow will come to mean a great deal to all of us.

(via wired.com)

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Apple iSlate

Posted in blog, Media by aldorf on January 23, 2010

(via fotoboer)

The tablet was called “Bashful,” in reference to the dwarf in the fairy tale Snow White. Those mock-ups show what the tablet might have looked like more than 25 years ago. With Apple expected to unveil its long-awaited tablet device on Wednesday, it seems like a good time to bring these photos out of the archives, Frog Design’s people thought. (via wired.com)

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