frank's blog

Throwable Panoramic Ball Camera

Posted in ideas, Media, photography by aldorf on October 15, 2011

Throwable Panoramic Ball Camera which captures a full spherical panorama when thrown into the air. At the peak of its flight, which is determined using an accelerometer, a full panoramic image is captured by 36 mobile phone camera modules.

Patent pending. More info: http://jonaspfeil.de/ballcamera

A project of the Computer Graphics Group, TU Berlin.

To be presented as an Emerging Technologies demonstration at the SIGGRAPH Asia 2011: Jonas Pfeil, Kristian Hildebrand, Carsten Gremzow, Bernd Bickel, Marc Alexa

Advertisements

The Hyper Island Way

Posted in ideas, inspiration, Media, quality by aldorf on September 19, 2011

5 Days in 5 Minutes – a video showing the inside story of the students’ process
with real briefs from real clients in a 5-day project assignment. This is Hyper Island.

Digital Rube Goldberg Processor

Posted in Animation, art, film, internet, Media by aldorf on August 4, 2011

 

The Digital Rube Goldberg Processor is the outcome of a workshop The Product collective gave at the HfG Karlsruhe (Design School). The team was invited to give a 4-day Processing workshop for the communication design students there. Since they understand it is impossible to teach programming to beginners just within 4 days, they decided to focus more on the essential topics behind generative and computational design, to provide a grounded starting point for the students.

Jens explains: We first gave a quick introduction to the processing environment, thematically centered around the actual matter of generative design, namely digital data. Given the fact that any stored data is binary code in the end, it is the encoding and decoding algorithms that make digital data meaningful for us. To create an awareness for that, we came up with the idea of the rube-goldberg-processor (wiki). It is an potentially endless line of sub-processors that transform the same dataset from one state into another. Each group of students had a translate-from-to assignment, e.g. from moving image to sound. To make the steps more comprehensible for observers, the transfer was made in an analog way (camera pointing to monitor, microphone in front of speaker…) In the end, this obvoiusly led to an indecipherable outcome, but on the way, the teams had to negotiate basic “protocols” and concerned themselves with several techniques that are used in computational design.

The Product team provided the first step (image to text) as well as the last step, the flickr uploader. The rest was done by the students.

For more teaching by The Product, see the-product.org/category/teaching

The Product a berlin-based spatial and media-related design practice. They conceive design concepts. They create installations. They animate surfaces. They design spaces. They develop objects. And they extensively think about the application and combination of technologies in meaningful ways.

Hack For A Cause – Making Physical Therapy For Kids A Bit More Fun

Posted in design, innovation, pioneers by aldorf on April 20, 2011

What I like about this kind of hack is that it’s not only entertaining, but truly helps people. Team Rice you have done a fantastic job here!

Rice University students are creating a diagnostic system using Wii Balance Boards to help patients at Shriners Hospital for Children-Houston learn to balance themselves. The project combines the talents of engineering seniors working at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen and students in Comp 460, Professor Joe Warren’s computer game design class.

College Kids Research On How Social Media Can Be Used Effectively

Posted in blog, ideas, internet, web, your take on... by aldorf on March 9, 2011
ASU Logo

Image via Wikipedia

Last year, Sprint gave students in a marketing class at Emerson College 10 smartphones with unlimited wireless access. In return, Sprint received free marketing work for their budding 4G network in Boston from students who blogged and tweeted, and more importantly were able to record firsthand how social media could be effectively used at the company.

Unbeknownst to many, companies have increasingly turned to universities for research on social media. This isn’t highly unusual, as traditionally manufacturers have given financial support to universities conducting research relevant to their companies. In the past though, support has been given to “hard” sciences, for example to the research of pharmaceutical drugs. Companies had never partnered with universities to better understand social media.

However, this appears to be changing. Programs at Northwestern, Emerson, Arizona State, and the University of Florida have been partnering with businesses to specifically research how social media can be used effectively. “It’s allowing for a new kind of research that just wasn’t even possible a few years ago,” says associate professor Dmitri Williams, the Wall Street Journal reports. In a world where social media continues to be a buzz word, businesses are looking for every advantage they can get.

As an example of how social media is being examined, the Wall Street Journal reported that at one class at Arizona State University, the students divided into teams to generate buzz around FoxSportsArizona.com. Fox Sports Net, a group of regional sports channels, will be working with 10 schools as part of a program it calls Creative University.

Despite the successful results from the companies thus far, is it a good idea for companies to conduct social media research at the university level?

Although there are advantages, as seen above, there are hidden costs as well. The time needed to establish a partnership with a program and the commitment the company gives to a university and its students; these may not always be financially related, but they are important nonetheless. Even with this commitment, in return the company would receive students who spend a limited amount of time per week on the project and who have multiple sources competing for their attention. As creative as students can be, they are not working 9AM to 5PM on these projects.

The lack of time and attention is particular true in the examples above, where businesses partnered with undergraduate programs. Traditionally, companies that have lent financial support to “hard” sciences have supported graduate programs, namely PhD students, and these students, in addition to having more time to spend, are under strict supervision. A PhD student, it could be argued, is more similar in their commitment to a project to a full-time employee than to an undergraduate student.

There is no such thing as a free lunch, and perhaps the costs, hidden or explicit, of conducting social media research at the undergraduate level outweigh the benefits. (via socialbeat)

 

Where Amazing Happens – India. Tablet Computer For $35!

Posted in ideas, Media, web by aldorf on July 24, 2010

(photo: ap)

India’s Human Resource Development Minister Kapil Sibal this week unveiled the low-cost computing device that is designed for students, saying his department had started talks with global manufacturers to start mass production to launch in 2011.

They actually plan to subsidize the cost of the tablet for its students, to bring the purchase price down to around $20.

“This is our answer to MIT’s $100 computer,” Kapil Sibal told the Economic Times when he unveiled the device Thursday.

In 2005, Nicholas Negroponte — co-founder of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab — unveiled a prototype of a $100 laptop for children in the developing world. India rejected that as too expensive and embarked on a multiyear effort to develop a cheaper option of its own.

If the government can find a manufacturer, the Linux operatingsystem-based computer would be the latest in a string of “world’s cheapest” innovations to hit the market out of India, which is home to the 100,000 rupee ($2,127) compact Nano car, the 749 rupees ($16) water purifier and the $2,000 open-heart surgery.

(read more…)

Neat Device Pulse Smart Pen by Livescribe

Posted in Media by aldorf on January 18, 2010

The Livescribe is a paper-based computing platform that consists of a smartpen, paper, software applications, and developer tools.

Jim Marggraff, CEO of Livescribe, shows off the 2GB, Java-capable Pulse Smartpen at the JavaOne conference in San Francisco. The pen records audio as the user takes handwritten notes, then synchs up the sound with the writing. Audio can then be played back when someone taps the pen on paper. The device also converts languages instantly, playing translations out loud through the embedded speaker or displaying the word on its LED screen.

You can find more video reviews on youtube. Like this one here.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

3iarts.net, Student Portfolios

Posted in Media, web by aldorf on December 22, 2009

Claudia Aguilar’s portrait studies 06-08 (HFK Bremen)

3iarts is a platform by students for students to show their work online. It shows the international, interdisciplinary and integrative work of many discliplines as design, digital media, music, and many other sub-disciplines. Browse through the network, and link your work.

%d bloggers like this: