frank's blog

A Kindle In Real Life – New York Secret Bookstore

Posted in architecture, Media by aldorf on October 17, 2011

How much digital space would it take..?

Michael Seidenberg, a used book dealer who has been selling books since the ’70s, recently converted his 84th Street apartment into a kind of salon for collectors. Accessible by appointment, Michael entertains anyone armed with a wine bottle. The Brazen Head (named after a John Cowper Powys work) has had several incarnations over the last 30 years: sharing a performance space near the Gowanus with a puppet company, in a storefront on 84th Street between Lexington and 3rd (now replaced by a laundromat), and along the sidewalks of Manhattan on folding tables.

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The Optimism Bias – Great Time Article by Tali Sharot

Posted in ideas, inspiration, quality by aldorf on June 2, 2011

The Optimism Bias, one of the best articles I have read in a while!

When we hear a success story like Mark Zuckerberg’s our brains take note of the possibility that we too may become immensely rich one day. But hearing that the odds of divorce are almost 1 in 2 tends not to make us think that our own marriages may be destined to fail.

(Illustration by Noma Bar)

New Book “The Open Innovation Marketplace: Creating Value in the Challenge Driven Enterprise”

Posted in innovation by aldorf on April 28, 2011

Books premise: Firms must adapt to survive in the 21st century. In this new “normal”, business is global, distributed, dynamic, and fast paced. Markets are hyper competitive and you are only as good as your last business, product, or technology innovation. Execution is critical, but not sufficient to succeed. Business leaders must fundamentally rethink their strategies to become more agile, flexible, and innovative than ever – and the stakes couldn’t be higher. Read more…

Think Quarterly – New Online Magazine by Google

Posted in blog, ideas, inspiration, Media by aldorf on March 24, 2011

Google has quietly launched its own full-length online magazine, a quarterly publication whose aim is to create a “breathing space in a busy world.”

The first edition of Think Quarterly, based out of the U.K., is a 68-page dive into the world of data and its impact on business. The first thing most people will notice is that it’s a visually stunning piece of work. It’s a rich Flash app with Google’s quirky sensibilities and the in-depth writing you might find in BusinessWeek or Salon. Google’s quarterly magazine is edited and designed by creative agency The Church of London.

The articles themselves are thought pieces about major business and technology topics from a variety of freelancers and contributors. Google was able to snag Simon Rogers (editor of The Guardian‘s Datablog), Ulrike Reinhard (editor of WE Magazine), and other journalists for the project. Many of Think Quarterly‘s articles feature interviews with Google executives and technology leaders. Some of the people featured include Vodafone U.K. CEO Guy Laurence, Google chief economist Hal Varian and famed psychologist Peter Kruse.

“At Google, we often think that speed is the forgotten ‘killer application’ – the ingredient that can differentiate winners from the rest,” Matt Brittin, Google’s managing director of U.K. and Ireland operations, said in Think Quarterly‘s introduction. “We know that the faster we deliver results, the more useful people find our service.

“But in a world of accelerating change, we all need time to reflect. Think Quarterly is a breathing space in a busy world. It’s a place to take time out and consider what’s happening and why it matters.”

It’s unclear whether the new online magazine is another sign that Google is entering the media business or whether it’s just a project to feed the company’s intellectual curiosity. Google doesn’t describe its newest project as a magazine or a publication. Instead, Google calls it a book on its website and a “unique communications tool” on its Twitter account.

Regardless of what you call it, Think Quarterly is an interesting and informative experiment by the search giant.

(via Mashable)

A Pretty Good Day For Trees: E-Books Selling Faster Than Hardcovers At Amazon

Posted in Media, web by aldorf on July 27, 2010

(photo via ifra.net)

In fact, e-books took the lead three month ago, since which time Amazon says it’s sold 143 Kindle books for every 100 hardcover books. What’s more, leaving their physical counterparts in the proverbial dust, e-books have outsold hardcovers at a rate of 180-to-100 over the last four weeks. (via mediapost)

The news marked “a day for the history books — if those will even exist in the future,” quipped The New York Times.

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