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The 25 Most Powerful Asian Executives by Forbes

Posted in innovation, quality by aldorf on May 4, 2011

 

The Fortune list of Asia’s most powerful people in business has many unfamiliar names. The list highlights the power shift in Asia, from Japan to China, India, and beyond. Toyota’s Akio Toyoda tops the list of 25 most powerful people in the business world. Six top executives from India also make it to the Fortune list.

1. Akio Toyoda

One of the most influential businessmen in the world, Akio Toyoda is the president and CEO of Toyota Motor Corporation. Grandson of Toyota founder Kiichiro, Toyoda joined the company in 1984. He joined Toyoto’s board of directors in 2000. Toyoda has played a key role in boosting sales and promoting the brand image of the company.

2. Ratan Tata

Chairman of the Tata Group, Ratan Tata is one of the most powerful business leaders in India. In 1981, JRD Tata stepped down as Tata Industries chairman, nominating Ratan as his successor. Ratan Tata is also the chairman of the major Tata companies, including Tata Motors, Tata Steel, Tata Consultancy Services, Tata Power, Tata Global Beverages, Tata Chemicals, Indian Hotels and Tata Teleservices. Under his leadership, the group’s revenues have grown nearly 12-fold, totalling $67.4 billion in 2009-10.

3. Mukesh Ambani

Mukesh Ambani, chairman of Reliance Industries, is an ace dealmaker. He has acquired assets in telecom, petrochemicals to expand $45-billion-a-year empire, says Fortune. He initiated Reliance’s backward integration journey from textiles into polyester fibres and further into petrochemicals, petroleum refining and going up-stream into oil and gas exploration and production. He created several new world class manufacturing facilities that have raised Reliance’s petrochemicals manufacturing capacities

4. Kun-Hee Lee

Son of Samsung Group founder Lee Byung-chull, Kun-Hee Lee is the chairman of Samsung Electronics. In 1996, Lee also became a member of the International Olympic Committee. With an estimated net worth of $7.4 billion, Kun-Hee Lee and family rank among the Forbesrichest people in the world.

5. Ren Zhengfei

Ren Zhengfei is the president of Huawei Technologies. With private assets worth $124 million, Ren is among the richest people in China. Ren founded Huawei Technologies Co in 1988 to specialise in the development, production, and sales of telecom equipment. Time magazine included Ren Zhengfei in its list of 100 most influential people in 2005.

6. Terry Gou, 60, chairman and CEO of Foxconn Technology Group, Taiwan

7. Gao Xiqing, 57, president and CIO of China Investment Corp, China

8. Wang Xiaochu, 53, chairman and CEO of China Telecom Corp, China

9. Jiang Jiemin, 55, chairman of PetroChina Co, China

10. Chung Mong-koo, 73, chairman and CEO of Hyundai Motor, Korea

Read more …

Key Insights From One of America’s First Chief Innovation Officers

Posted in innovation, quality, your take on... by aldorf on May 4, 2011

Amy Radin became one of America’s first Chief Innovation Officers when Citigroup appointed her to the role in 2005. She is currently Chief Innovation officer at E*E*Trade Financial, the leading online discount stock brokerage. (via innovationmanagement.se)

A tangible corporate structure is becoming less necessary for delivering goods and services to consumers, so there’s more pressure on established businesses to embrace technology.


The key to success is to fail fast and fail cheap; harvest the learnings and move on.


Innovation is not a one-year return on investment, or time…. you should probably take a 24-36 month view.


Main steps managers would need to take to adopt Ami Radin’s VC-type innovation approach:

  • Establish a pipeline or portfolio of bets approach.
  • Focus on understanding potential market/universe size and unit-level business model/economics, not a full P&L statement early on.
  • Make the effort to uncover real market needs within the universe of people whom you would like to serve, and stay relentlessly focused on delivering them.
  • Engage all functions in the organization as early on as possible. People want to be included, and helping them see what is going on along the way is invaluable.
  • Don’t automatically apply traditional business process to innovation – it needs to be faster, more iterative, and is inherently different than how companies may approach running a well-oiled machine.
  • Don’t underestimate the criticality of leadership and culture. These will make or break your success. This includes fully-engaging the CEO in your innovation efforts.

Key characteristics of good people in the innovation space:

  • Left brain/right brain thinkers
  • Bias for execution and getting things done
  • The wiring of a start up employee combined with a healthy respect for the benefits of being in an established company (brand, resources, talent, expertise, franchise)
  • Leadership ability, which includes influence, communications, teamwork, collaboration
  • Ability to embrace ambiguity and not get flustered by it
Read full story at innovationmanagement.se


7 Step Framework for Leaders by Deepak Chopra

Posted in blog, inspiration, quality by aldorf on April 28, 2011

(via Sources of Insights) Thanks JD Meier for sharing your insights.

7 Step Framework for Leaders by Deepak Chopra
If you can spell “Leaders”, that’s the key to remembering Deepak’s leadership framework.  Each letter represents a different aspect of being an effective leader:

  1. L – LOOK and LISTEN. Look and listen with your flesh – eyes and ears.  Look and listen with your mind – so you analyze the facts.  Look and listen with your heart — how do you feel about things?  Paint a vision.  The vision has to be compelling.  It has to be inspiring.  It has to be a story.  Deepak says we can get all the facts, but  what gives soul to facts is story.  The story has to authentic and it has to make a difference in our lives.    Without the story, facts remain clinical.  People are actually buying into a story, not the facts.
  2. E – EMOTIONAL BONDING.  Be comfortable with your own emotions.  Understand the emotions of others.  Use emotional intelligence.  Manage relationship in a way that fosters that bonding.  Deepak says that when people are emotionally bonded they are much more effective.
  3. A – AWARENESS.   Be aware of needs and know what’s needed here.  Deepak reminded us there are 7 levels of need from safety to survival to belonging to self-esteem to creative expression to hired consciousness to success.
  4. D – DOING.  Be action-oriented.    If you’re not taking action, then it’s just a dream.  Be a role model for action.  As a tip, Deepak suggests asking your colleagues, “Am I doing what I said i was doing?”  Ask for feedback.  Take calculated risks.  If you’re not going to task risks, then the story remains the same.  According to Deepak, the story only changes when you take calculated risks.
  5. E – EMPOWER YOURSELF.  Empower others.    One of the best ways you can empower others is by noticing their strengths.  Deepak pointed out that according to Gallup research, if you don’t notice their strength, they disengage.   If you criticize them, their disengagement goes up by 20%.  If you ignore them, it goes up by 45%.   If you notice a single strength, disengagement falls to less than 1%.
  6. R – RESPONSIBILITY.  Take initiative.  Take risks.  Above all maintain good health.  Deepak says that .leaders who are really effective are emotionally and physically grounded and stable.  That means getting good sleep, exercising, watching their diet, and they now how to manage stress.
  7. S – SYNCHRONICITY.
more at Sources of Insights…
Deepak Chopra Live

How Much A Country’s Leader Is Paid Compared To GDP Per Person

Posted in Uncategorized, your take on... by aldorf on July 23, 2010

On Monday July 5th Raila Odinga, Kenya’s prime minister, rejected the pay increase he was awarded by the country’s parliament last week. MPs had granted Mr Odinga a rise to nearly $430,000 a year, while giving themselves a 25% increase to $161,000. This boost would place Mr Odinga among the highest-paid political leaders in the world. More worryingly, his salary would be some 240 times greater than the country’s GDP per person. (read more…)

(source: the economist)

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