frank's blog

Real World Infographics in 3-D

Posted in design, illustration, photography by aldorf on April 27, 2011

Infographics in 2-D are great, but real life, 3-D infographics are even more mesmerizing and interesting. Jose Duarte, a graphic designer, has been using found physical objects to present his data findings. For example, the balloons you see above represent the amount of Internet users there are in (from left to right) China, Europe, India, Brazil, Mexico, and Portugal. (via Holy Kaw!)

Where Amazing Happens – India. Tablet Computer For $35!

Posted in ideas, Media, web by aldorf on July 24, 2010

(photo: ap)

India’s Human Resource Development Minister Kapil Sibal this week unveiled the low-cost computing device that is designed for students, saying his department had started talks with global manufacturers to start mass production to launch in 2011.

They actually plan to subsidize the cost of the tablet for its students, to bring the purchase price down to around $20.

“This is our answer to MIT’s $100 computer,” Kapil Sibal told the Economic Times when he unveiled the device Thursday.

In 2005, Nicholas Negroponte — co-founder of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab — unveiled a prototype of a $100 laptop for children in the developing world. India rejected that as too expensive and embarked on a multiyear effort to develop a cheaper option of its own.

If the government can find a manufacturer, the Linux operatingsystem-based computer would be the latest in a string of “world’s cheapest” innovations to hit the market out of India, which is home to the 100,000 rupee ($2,127) compact Nano car, the 749 rupees ($16) water purifier and the $2,000 open-heart surgery.

(read more…)

callingallinnovators.com by Nokia

Posted in ideas by aldorf on January 18, 2010

The Nokia Growth Economy Venture Challenge is awarding the entrant with the best idea for the emerging markets a $1 million investment from Nokia.

They have fielded lots of local teams to research markets around the world and have found that Nokia needs to help make local solutions viable to increase phone usage. The world’s biggest cell phone maker has sold more than 750 million basic phones in the emerging markets over the last five years. The 1616, costs around $32, a month’s wage in many countries. Yet it sells in huge number, thanks to customized services that makes it far more useful in emerging markets. In India, Nokia has set up a system, Progress Project, to allow small business (like farms) to send transactional data back and forth via text message. So whole businesses are running on cell phones, with farmers in rural areas able to auction off onions in western India. Nokia Money service brings together payments on a global scale. It isn’t tied to a single bank, carrier, or country. It’s important because 75 percent of the world’s people still haven’t sent an email. The company hopes that developers will create many more apps that can be useful in different regions of the world, from Sesame Street educational phone apps to local business directories. (CEO Olli-Pekka Kallasvuo at CES)


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