frank's blog

“The New Normal” by Peter Hinssen [Video]

Posted in ideas, internet, quality by aldorf on August 10, 2011

The idea behind the New Normal is quite simple: ‘We’re halfway there’. The New Normal is about all things we call ‘digital’, and in the digital revolution we’re probably only halfway there. That means we have as much journey ahead of us as we have behind us.

 

In The New Normal Peter presents how companies may address a society without digital limits. Quite poignantly, Peter points out that organizations are increasingly faced with customers and consumers who no longer tolerate limitations in terms of pricing, timing, patience, depth, privacy, convenience, intelligence. A number of new rules will apply in the New Normal. Consumers will have zero tolerance for digital failure. They will expect to get internet access anytime, anyplace. Internet and connectivity will be just as ubiquitous as electricity. Consumers will demand fulfillment of their information needs instantaneously. The effect on companies will be tremendous. They were just getting used to coping with an 24 hour economy, and now they will have to cope with the ‘experience economy’: customers will demand interaction with providers of services and products on their conditions. They will expect the digital user experience to be easy and interesting. Every interaction with a customer must be viewed as a ‘make or break’ moment for the relationship with the customer. IT departments too will have to adopt a new way of working. They will have to react more flexible to the demands of the business side of the company. IT-departments were used to build big systems, now they will have to create small, flexible structures that can be adapted quickly. They no longer have to build pyramids, they must put up tents instead. In The New Normal, Peter Hinssen looks at the way companies have to adapt their information strategy, their technology strategy, their innovation strategy and the way they are organized internally. This book is an interesting read for any manager who is concerned with the future of his company as it is hit by the digital revolution. (via Peter Hinssen.com)

Grow Your Own Clothes – Experiments with Kombucha-Based Material

Posted in art, fashion, food, innovation, pioneers by aldorf on May 11, 2011

Designer Suzanne Lee shares her experiments in growing a kombucha-based material that can be used like fabric or vegetable leather to make clothing. The process is fascinating, the results are beautiful (though there’s still one minor drawback …) and the potential is simply stunning.

Fashion designer Suzanne Lee directs the BioCouture research project, which sprang from an idea in her book Fashioning the Future: Tomorrow’s Wardrobe, a seminal text on fashion and future technologies. Her research harnesses nature to propose a radical future fashion vision: Can we grow a dress from a vat of liquid?

Using bacterial-cellulose, Lee aims to address pressing ecological and sustainability issues around fashion and beyond. A Senior Research Fellow at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, she is working with scientists to investigate whether synthetic biology can engineer optimized organisms for growing future consumer products

“I’m also creating new bacterial-cellulose composite swatches looking at eco-substrates like hemp. This month I’m teaching an exciting project exploring systems and synthetic biology to postgraduate textile and industrial design students alongside eminent scientists from Cambridge University.” Suzanne Lee

New Entertainment Ecosystem – UltraViolet

Posted in film, innovation, internet, Media, music, quality by aldorf on January 18, 2011

the Ultraviolet video is a bit cheesy but worth watching. Dece Ultraviolet is

the latest attempt by the entertainment industry to distribute its content securely. The basic idea behind UltraViolet is the cloud based digital locker for content and rights licenses. DECE (Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem) which is a cross-industry consortium of over 50 companies (and growing, Apple and Disney are missing!) committed to make UltraViolet the next generation standard for rich media experience where the users will get the flexibility and user experience they’ve been denied for over a decade now. With UltraViolet, users will be able to download, stream, share and even get copies for use on physical media, basically covering a great deal of the average user needs in terms of interoperability and user experience. BUT that’s solving just half (or less) of the issues. Technical agreement on a common file format is a good start, but the business model side remains an open issue. And history has shown the poor ability of the entertainment industry to be creative in this space.

 

 

(via Lift Conference)

Shift – Increasing Number Of New Product Launches In Emerging Markets

Posted in ideas, your take on... by aldorf on December 7, 2010

China’s retail sales rose 18.7% year on year to USD 183 billion in May 2010.

China’s retail sales may outstrip those of the US by reaching USD 5 trillion in 2016.

52% of consumers whose annual income exceeds RMB 250,000 (USD 36,765) trust foreign brands more than Chinese ones.

 

 

“LightTouch” by Light Blue Optics

Posted in ideas, Media by aldorf on January 17, 2010

Light Blue Optics just announced Light Touch. A laser projector that turns any flat surface into an auto-focused and image-adjusted 10-inch touchscreen with WVGA resolution. The Holographic Laser Projection (HLP™) is a revolution in display technology. Light Touch runs Adobe Flash Lite 3.1 and includes WiFi andBluetooth radios. 2GB of on-board storage and a battery capable of about 2-hours worth of runtime.

Texas Instruments is a leader in the market of digital light processing chips.

Watch a video of a Samsung cell phone with built in DLP™ pico projector here.

Let’s Carrotmob

Posted in ideas by aldorf on December 10, 2009

Carrotmob is a method of activism that leverages consumer power to make the most socially-responsible business practices also the most profitable choices. Businesses compete with one another to see who can do the most good, and then a big mob of consumers buys products in order to reward whichever business made the strongest commitment to improve the world. It’s the opposite of a boycott.

It’s easier to understand if you look at an example. In the first ever Carrotmob event, a liquor store agreed to invest in upgrades that made their store more energy-efficient. In exchange, hundreds of Carrotmobbers showed up at once to support the winning liquor store. To the right is a video of that campaign, and the mayhem that ensued…

So…that video might be a little heavy on the dancing, but it explains the concept rather well. Now, choose a category below and we’ll tell you why the people in that category tend to love Carrotmob…

Other links:
twitter.com/carrotmob
twitter.com/virgance
1bog.org

Vodpod videos no longer available.

%d bloggers like this: