frank's blog

Music Piracy – New Research Shows That Restrictions Don’t Work

Posted in internet, Media, music by aldorf on October 17, 2011

(Credit: Emin Ozkan / Shutterstock)

“[The late] Steve Jobs said it best: ‘Why would the big four music companies agree to let Apple and others distribute their music without using DRM systems to protect it? The simplest answer is because DRMs haven’t worked, and may never work, to halt music piracy.'” says marketing professor Dinah Vernik. “And our research presented a counterintuitive conclusion that in fact, removing the DRM can be more effective in decreasing music piracy than making the DRM more stringent.”

Because a DRM-restricted product will only be purchased by a legal user, “only the legal users pay the price and suffer from the restrictions,” the researchers write. “Illegal users are not affected because the pirated product does not have DRM restrictions.”

“Removal of these restrictions makes the product more convenient to use and intensifies competition with the traditional format (CDs), which has no DRM restrictions,” Vernik says. “This increased competition results in decreased prices for both downloadable and CD music and makes it more likely that consumers will move from stealing music to buying legal downloads.” Read full article here.

 

 

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c60 Redux – Touch Your Digital Music

Posted in design, innovation, Media, music by aldorf on December 21, 2010

by IDEO’s Design Director Martin Bone and Materials Scientist Kara Johnson.

The concept behind the C60 Redux is this: We’ve gone from handling vinyl, tapes and CD‘s to clicking on MP3’s, losing tactility in the process and making a casualty of the mix tape. Is it possible to bring that back in a digital way? Bone, Johnson, and a group of IDEO designers endeavored to do so by creating a music player built with RFID readers and some Arduino Mini Pros, all housed in a record player case. See for yourself.

(via Core77)

 

Beautiful Technology, 1-Bit Symphony by Tristan Perich

Posted in art, music by aldorf on August 26, 2010

Tristan Perich’s 1-Bit Symphony is an electronic composition in five movements on a single microchip.

Symphony is not a recording in the traditional sense; it literally “performs” its music live when turned on. A complete electronic circuit—programmed by the artist and assembled by hand—plays the music through a headphone jack mounted into the case itself. The album is available from Cantaloupe Music.

See Tristan and his 1-Bit Symphony on vimeo.

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