frank's blog

Booktwo – Investigate The Future Of Literature And The Publishing Industry

Posted in art, blog, Media by aldorf on December 1, 2011

The book is dead. Long live the book.

Founded in September 2006 by James Bridle, booktwo.org exists to investigate, analyse, catalogue and debate the future of literature and the publishing industry.

Booktwo.org was founded out of a frustration with the failure of trade publishing to engage with new media and technology, a frustration reflected in the first essay: Birth Pangs of a new Literature. Over time, the industry has started to change, but booktwo.org continues to champion and challenge new literary forms and new publishing models.

James Bridle worked in a number of roles within and outside the publishing industry, from publicity and marketing to editorial, and from online strategy to web application development and production. His personal site can be found at shorttermmemoryloss.com.

Disrupt Normal

Posted in inspiration, quality by aldorf on November 26, 2011

from End Malaria, the cool new book by Michael Bungay Stanier.

A Kindle In Real Life – New York Secret Bookstore

Posted in architecture, Media by aldorf on October 17, 2011

How much digital space would it take..?

Michael Seidenberg, a used book dealer who has been selling books since the ’70s, recently converted his 84th Street apartment into a kind of salon for collectors. Accessible by appointment, Michael entertains anyone armed with a wine bottle. The Brazen Head (named after a John Cowper Powys work) has had several incarnations over the last 30 years: sharing a performance space near the Gowanus with a puppet company, in a storefront on 84th Street between Lexington and 3rd (now replaced by a laundromat), and along the sidewalks of Manhattan on folding tables.

“The New Normal” by Peter Hinssen [Video]

Posted in ideas, internet, quality by aldorf on August 10, 2011

The idea behind the New Normal is quite simple: ‘We’re halfway there’. The New Normal is about all things we call ‘digital’, and in the digital revolution we’re probably only halfway there. That means we have as much journey ahead of us as we have behind us.

 

In The New Normal Peter presents how companies may address a society without digital limits. Quite poignantly, Peter points out that organizations are increasingly faced with customers and consumers who no longer tolerate limitations in terms of pricing, timing, patience, depth, privacy, convenience, intelligence. A number of new rules will apply in the New Normal. Consumers will have zero tolerance for digital failure. They will expect to get internet access anytime, anyplace. Internet and connectivity will be just as ubiquitous as electricity. Consumers will demand fulfillment of their information needs instantaneously. The effect on companies will be tremendous. They were just getting used to coping with an 24 hour economy, and now they will have to cope with the ‘experience economy’: customers will demand interaction with providers of services and products on their conditions. They will expect the digital user experience to be easy and interesting. Every interaction with a customer must be viewed as a ‘make or break’ moment for the relationship with the customer. IT departments too will have to adopt a new way of working. They will have to react more flexible to the demands of the business side of the company. IT-departments were used to build big systems, now they will have to create small, flexible structures that can be adapted quickly. They no longer have to build pyramids, they must put up tents instead. In The New Normal, Peter Hinssen looks at the way companies have to adapt their information strategy, their technology strategy, their innovation strategy and the way they are organized internally. This book is an interesting read for any manager who is concerned with the future of his company as it is hit by the digital revolution. (via Peter Hinssen.com)

“To Do Good, You First Have To Do Something.”

Posted in inspiration, pioneers, Quotes Of The Day by aldorf on August 2, 2011

[Yvon Chouinard, Founder of Patagonia]

I recommend reading his book Let My People Go Surfing” 

New Book “The Open Innovation Marketplace: Creating Value in the Challenge Driven Enterprise”

Posted in innovation by aldorf on April 28, 2011

Books premise: Firms must adapt to survive in the 21st century. In this new “normal”, business is global, distributed, dynamic, and fast paced. Markets are hyper competitive and you are only as good as your last business, product, or technology innovation. Execution is critical, but not sufficient to succeed. Business leaders must fundamentally rethink their strategies to become more agile, flexible, and innovative than ever – and the stakes couldn’t be higher. Read more…

A Visual Life – Beautiful Short About “The Sartorialist”

Posted in blog, fashion, film, Media by aldorf on April 26, 2011

Thanks Tyler Manson (Director) and Intel (Visual Life Series) for this shortfilm about a man visually articulating his vision of style and photography. Enjoyed it very much!

Related Articles

Think Quarterly – New Online Magazine by Google

Posted in blog, ideas, inspiration, Media by aldorf on March 24, 2011

Google has quietly launched its own full-length online magazine, a quarterly publication whose aim is to create a “breathing space in a busy world.”

The first edition of Think Quarterly, based out of the U.K., is a 68-page dive into the world of data and its impact on business. The first thing most people will notice is that it’s a visually stunning piece of work. It’s a rich Flash app with Google’s quirky sensibilities and the in-depth writing you might find in BusinessWeek or Salon. Google’s quarterly magazine is edited and designed by creative agency The Church of London.

The articles themselves are thought pieces about major business and technology topics from a variety of freelancers and contributors. Google was able to snag Simon Rogers (editor of The Guardian‘s Datablog), Ulrike Reinhard (editor of WE Magazine), and other journalists for the project. Many of Think Quarterly‘s articles feature interviews with Google executives and technology leaders. Some of the people featured include Vodafone U.K. CEO Guy Laurence, Google chief economist Hal Varian and famed psychologist Peter Kruse.

“At Google, we often think that speed is the forgotten ‘killer application’ – the ingredient that can differentiate winners from the rest,” Matt Brittin, Google’s managing director of U.K. and Ireland operations, said in Think Quarterly‘s introduction. “We know that the faster we deliver results, the more useful people find our service.

“But in a world of accelerating change, we all need time to reflect. Think Quarterly is a breathing space in a busy world. It’s a place to take time out and consider what’s happening and why it matters.”

It’s unclear whether the new online magazine is another sign that Google is entering the media business or whether it’s just a project to feed the company’s intellectual curiosity. Google doesn’t describe its newest project as a magazine or a publication. Instead, Google calls it a book on its website and a “unique communications tool” on its Twitter account.

Regardless of what you call it, Think Quarterly is an interesting and informative experiment by the search giant.

(via Mashable)

Great Leaders Are Great Storytellers

Posted in inspiration, quality by aldorf on March 15, 2011
Hollywood Sign

Image via Wikipedia

“The ability to weave a tale is among the most powerful elements in any leader’s repertoire.” Hollywood producer and Mandalay Entertainment CEO Peter Guber (“The Kids Are All Right“, Oscar nominee ‘Best Picture‘). Here are four that stand out.

Former President Bill Clinton

Though not technically a business leader, Clinton’s leadership skills are formidable. “He is able to glean whats in it for his listener get their attention and then their intention,” Guber says. “His authenticity of purpose enters the room before he speaks the first word. He charms them and disarms them and then rearms them with his narratives.”

Apple Founder Steve Jobs

“Jobs’ Job One is story,” Guber says. ” he knows his devotees can’t just be customers—he needs apostles for his products who tell his story as their own and move it forward. Look at the lines in front of his stores when he opens new products. After he tells his story, the reaction reminds me of folks waiting for a big movie opening.”

POM Founder Lynda Resnick

“Story is Lynda’s mantra,” Guber says. “If she can’t find the story she can tell in the product, she simply doesn’t sell the product. Whether it is POM Wonderful, the pomegranate juice, Get Crackin’ pistachios, or replicas of Jackie O’s pearls, her narrative wins the day and hearts of her audience.”

Under Armour Founder Kevin Plank

“Kevin uses stories to create the impression among athletes that wearing Under Armour beneath your game shirt is a way to drive and fulfill your aspirations as a competitor,” Guber says. “He takes a story about perspiration and brings it to the level of inspiration.”

Great TED Talk – Steven Johnson: Where Good Ideas Come From

Posted in ideas, innovation, inspiration by aldorf on October 3, 2010

People often credit their ideas to individual “Eureka!” moments. But Steven Johnson shows how history tells a different story. His fascinating tour takes us from the “liquid networks” of London’s coffee houses to Charles Darwin‘s long, slow hunch to today’s high-velocity web.

About Steven Johnson

Steven Berlin Johnson is the best-selling author of six books on the intersection of science, technology and personal experience. His forthcoming book examines “Where Good Ideas Come From.” Full bio and more links

%d bloggers like this: