frank's blog

“Gravity’s Migraine” At The Standard | Hollywood

Posted in architecture, art by aldorf on January 12, 2012

Tim Biskup and his most recent installation titled Gravity’s Migraine. The see through cube which sits behind the hotel’s reception desk featured a woman inside the space which brings to the forefront issues of voyeurism and  the lack of privacy.  The core idea behind these installations is how objects can take on an entirely new shape by simply changing their visual perspective. When looking simply at the cube, it’s interesting to note how the lines on the cube’s glass create this fractal look which merge with the layers of blue and white patterns painted within the transparent box; thus, creating new shapes that duplicate Biskup’s style in a three dimensional landscape.

 

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Forever Bicycles :::: New Installation by Ai Weiwei

Posted in architecture, art by aldorf on January 11, 2012

Attention To Detail – Product Design by Joey Roth

Posted in architecture, design, inspiration, quality by aldorf on January 9, 2012

In love with these speakers…

 

view joeyroth.com

A Kindle In Real Life – New York Secret Bookstore

Posted in architecture, Media by aldorf on October 17, 2011

How much digital space would it take..?

Michael Seidenberg, a used book dealer who has been selling books since the ’70s, recently converted his 84th Street apartment into a kind of salon for collectors. Accessible by appointment, Michael entertains anyone armed with a wine bottle. The Brazen Head (named after a John Cowper Powys work) has had several incarnations over the last 30 years: sharing a performance space near the Gowanus with a puppet company, in a storefront on 84th Street between Lexington and 3rd (now replaced by a laundromat), and along the sidewalks of Manhattan on folding tables.

Design for Download by Droog

Posted in architecture, design, innovation by aldorf on August 3, 2011

This revolution of open design is already happening. With design companies like Droog starting to believe  in this type of concept it will just gain bigger momentum.

When Droog launches its game-changing Design for Download website in the coming months, it will do for design in the 21st century what Ikea did in the 20th—democratize it—in this case by bringing design directly to anyone with an Internet connection, with no international shipping or middlemen required. Just choose and configure your design, download the schematics, and either take them to a nearby fabricator or give it a try yourself. Among the first online offerings will be open-source decorative electrical sockets, tables and chairs made with wood and 3-D printable brackets, and shelves whose composition can be customized using Droog’s new software.

(via Domus:) Droog continues to explore programmatic design issues. The group’s focus has always extended beyond the trends to concentrate on processes, production chains and user applications since it was founded in 1993 by Gijs Bakker and Renny Ramakers. Always conscious of social and market signs and changes, Droog has been analysing goods production methods.

Time is Money – “Ten in Three” Idea

Posted in architecture, conference, ideas, inspiration, internet by aldorf on July 27, 2011

There are numerous efforts in the non-profit sector to re-think the way people donate, but not many with a method quite so personal as Taylor Conroy’s. Ten In Three is his initiative to persuade groups of friends to contribute USD 10,000 in just three hours, to be put towards the construction of a new school in a disadvantaged area. Amazing and inspiring idea!

Beautiful – MADE Berlin Project “Captured: Homage to Light and Air”

Posted in Animation, architecture, art by aldorf on June 30, 2011

A creative clash by graphic designer Sven Völker and machine artist Nils Völker.

A Cardboard Column With 16 Million Facets – Michael Hansmeyer in Berlin

Posted in architecture, art by aldorf on May 4, 2011

(Photos Michael Hansmeyer + thisiscolossal.com)

One of Michael Hansmeyer’s cardboard column is in an exhibit right next door to my house at Smallspace Gallery, Berlin. He is a computational architect who examines the use of algorithms and computation to generate architectural forms. This project, Subdivided Columns – A New Order is a 9-foot column that weighs nearly 2,000 pounds generated by iterating a subdivision algorithm and then utilizing a laser to delicately slice each segment of cardboard. Michael Hansmeyer uses algorithms invented by Pixar.

A full-scale, 2.7-meter high variant of the columns is fabricated as a layered model using 1mm sheet. Each sheet is individually cut using a mill or laser. Sheets are stacked and held together by poles that run through a common core.

The calculation of the cutting path for each sheet takes place in several steps. First, the six million faces of the 3D model are intersected with a plane representing the sheet. This step generates a series of individual line segments that are tested for self-intersection and subsequently combined to form polygons. Next, a polygon-in-polygon test deletes interior polygons. A series of filters then ensures that convex polygons with peninsulas maintain a mininimum isthmus width. In a final step, an interior offset is calculated with the aim of hollowing out the slice to reduce weight.

See more images at artist website 

Read an article on FastCo 

Upcycling Old Carpets – Stunning Business Idea

Posted in architecture, design by aldorf on May 4, 2011

ColorReform™ by ABC Carpets.

New Museum to Get Projection-Mapped

Posted in architecture, art, conference by aldorf on May 1, 2011

I wish I could be there….

Artist Mia Pearlman (pictured above) — along with Vito Acconci, photographer Marilyn Minter, and with help from SOFTlab — will be featured in a performance played out on the façade of the New Museum on Saturday, May 7.

Let Us Make Cake is a collaborative projection directed by Nuit Blanche New York and Light Harvest Studios. Dozens of artists were asked to interact with scale models of the New Museum ranging in size from 11 inches to 11 feet, embracing the museum as both a canvas and vessel. The resulting footage will be projection-mapped onto the New Museum, marking the first time projection has been used to animate the entire 174-foot facade.

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