frank's blog

The Resume Is Dead, The Bio Is King

Posted in blog, ideas, inspiration, quality, your take on... by aldorf on August 2, 2011

[via 99%]

If you’re a designer, entrepreneur, or creative – you probably

haven’t been asked for your resume in a long time. Instead,

people Google you – and quickly assess your talents based on

your website, portfolio, and social media profiles. Do they

resonate with what you’re sharing? Do they identify with your

story? Are you even giving them a story to wrap their head

around?

That’s why the resume is on the out, and the bio is on the rise. People work with

people they can relate to and identify with. Your bio needs to tell the

bigger story. Especially, when you’re in business for yourself, or in the business

of relationships. It’s your bio that’s read first.

To help you with this, your bio should address the following five

questions:

1. Who am I?

2. How can I help you?

3. How did I get here (i.e. know what I know)?

4. Why can you trust me?

5. What do we share in common?

here are a few key pointers for reinventing your bio as a story:

1. Share a Point of View.

You’re a creative. Having something to say is the ultimate proof. 

What’s missing from the larger conversation? Speak to that. Don’t be afraid 

to tell the bigger story. We want to know how you see the world. 

Show us that you have a unique perspective or fresh vantage point on the 

things that matter most.

2. Create a Backstory.

Explain the origin for how you came to see the world in this way. 

Maybe it was something that happened to you as a kid or early in your career. Consider your superhero origins. How did you come into these powers? 

What set you off on this quest or journey? What’s the riddle or mystery you are 

still trying to solve? When you tell the story of who you were meant to be, it becomes an undeniable story. Natural authority is speaking from the place of 

what you know and have lived.

3. Incorporate External Validators.

Think frugally here. To paraphrase the artist De La Vega, we spend too much 

time trying to convince others, instead of believing in ourselves. Nonetheless, 

if you’re doing something new, different, or innovative – you have to anchor 

it into the familiar. Help people see that your novel ideas are connected to 

things they recognize and trust. That might be your notable clients, press, publications, or things you’ve created. Just enough to show people your story 

is for real.

4. Invite people into relationship.

Now that you’ve established you’ve got something to share, remind people 

you’re not so different from them. Vulnerability is the new black. 

Share some guilty pleasures. Describe what you like to geek out on. Reveal 

a couple things you obsess about as hobbies or interests. This will make you 

more approachable and relatable. You’re human, too. Help people find 

the invisible lines of connection.


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One Response

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  1. Sophie Murray-Morris said, on August 2, 2011 at 12:00 pm

    Very interesting! Something I never quite realised.


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