frank's blog

New Book “The Open Innovation Marketplace: Creating Value in the Challenge Driven Enterprise”

Posted in innovation by aldorf on April 28, 2011

Books premise: Firms must adapt to survive in the 21st century. In this new “normal”, business is global, distributed, dynamic, and fast paced. Markets are hyper competitive and you are only as good as your last business, product, or technology innovation. Execution is critical, but not sufficient to succeed. Business leaders must fundamentally rethink their strategies to become more agile, flexible, and innovative than ever – and the stakes couldn’t be higher. Read more…

How To Turn Noise Into Useful Energy – Prototype

Posted in conference, design, innovation, pioneers by aldorf on April 28, 2011

(Photo: iStockphoto)

Where some people hear noise, Jeong Ho You hears energy. “Acoustic energy is everywhere,” he says. And with the help of a tiny resonating chamber, he wants to trap some of that energy and convert it into a low-amperage current for use in small electronic devices. You, a mechanical engineer at Southern Methodist University, in Dallas, will be presenting the results of a computer simulation of a resonating chamber design at next month’s Acoustical Society of America meeting in Seattle. He then plans to build a device to see how his idea holds up in the lab. Read more…

Hire Great People – David Kelley, IDEO

Posted in conference, ideas, quality by aldorf on April 28, 2011

(watch the video or read the transcript)

“The next thing I want to say is about hiring great people. It seems like this is pretty obvious, but many people don’t spend a lot of time on it. They kind of have a conventional HR department or a conventional way of choosing who works in their company. I think you have to spend much more energy on it and be much more creative about deciding who it is that you hire. The individual is important. You certainly have to hire people who don’t fit into your organization or who can stimulate the organization and don’t kind of have the kind of corporate code involved in them. This is kind of a Bob Sutton kind of point of view. But more and more it’s about the team. Building hot teams. And that involves having people with many different disciplines, people who are generalists but also have empathy for people who are experts at different areas. Hal Levitt’s book about hot groups, you can read that and find all the things that are necessary to make a hot group. It’s very important that the groups be of a size. Many of the groups that I belong to, like the Mechanical Engineering faculty, are too large to actually be a hot group. And so you have to spend a lot of time figuring out how to make the group small enough, eight to 12 people, so that they can function by breaking the group down into those sizes. But one of the main things is just to have an unfair advantage in doing your hiring. IDEO has this unfair advantage called Stanford University which we’ve snuggled up next to and have a strong program with. Many companies should have closer relationships with their local universities. I’ve been quoted lots of times in places like Fortune. There’s an article about how I’m basically saying if I hire the right people and everything else will work out. I mean, that’s not exactly true, but it makes for good journalism. But the main thing about hiring people is you have to have a point of view about who you want in your company. And I don’t mean that you want people who have four Os from a certain school in their circuits courses. And Bob Sutton, who studied IDEO for a long time, who’s a professor here, has this point of view that he calls ‘attitude of wisdom’. And so IDEO goes about hiring, we make sure that every single person who’s hired by the company has been what we call ‘lunched’ by 10 other people, meaning that you’ve been taken to lunch by that person and that person gives you a 9, a 10 on a scale of ‘this is a good fit for IDEO’. One of the major fits is what we call the ‘attitude of wisdom’, which is, is this person the kind of person who has the force of personality to really get their ideas out there, because we really want somebody who is not shy about getting their ideas out and vocal about it and works hard at trying to win everybody over that theirs is a good idea, and that they have the balance with that to actually consider that their idea might be improved upon by others. And you know the kind of people who have one side or the other, right? Too shy to kind of get involved or too arrogant to not see that their idea can be improved upon and built upon by others. And so looking for that balance, it’s really easy to see who has that characteristic. And it turns out that kind of technical competence around here and so forth is easier to find and this kind of fit is hard. And this is where I talk about limits to growth. IDEO has not grown at all based on financial reasons or how much money we want to make or what the numbers went to be. We grow because we find another one of these people. So we started with two, we’re at about 430, and it’s just from one at a time picking off these people. When the dotcoms were growing really good, I was on the board of a few of them and they were like hiring stuff and they kept saying what great people they had, and I thought to myself that as they approach the total population of the United States–like 250 million people–in their company, by definition they would have average people in their company. If you know about having a good group, if you don’t have a t-shirt, if your group is not represented by a t-shirt, then you’re not part of a really good group.”

Another video on that topic by Marissa Mayer, she joined Google in 1999 as Google’s first female engineer and led the user interface and webserver teams at that time. She is Vice President of Location and Local Services at the company.

Challenge yourself against better players and you’ll become star of the team.  Google’s Vice President of Location and Local Services, Marissa Mayer, reflects on her personal experience working with some of the finest talent in high-tech, and points out that working with the best empowers each player to excel.

7 Step Framework for Leaders by Deepak Chopra

Posted in blog, inspiration, quality by aldorf on April 28, 2011

(via Sources of Insights) Thanks JD Meier for sharing your insights.

7 Step Framework for Leaders by Deepak Chopra
If you can spell “Leaders”, that’s the key to remembering Deepak’s leadership framework.  Each letter represents a different aspect of being an effective leader:

  1. L – LOOK and LISTEN. Look and listen with your flesh – eyes and ears.  Look and listen with your mind – so you analyze the facts.  Look and listen with your heart — how do you feel about things?  Paint a vision.  The vision has to be compelling.  It has to be inspiring.  It has to be a story.  Deepak says we can get all the facts, but  what gives soul to facts is story.  The story has to authentic and it has to make a difference in our lives.    Without the story, facts remain clinical.  People are actually buying into a story, not the facts.
  2. E – EMOTIONAL BONDING.  Be comfortable with your own emotions.  Understand the emotions of others.  Use emotional intelligence.  Manage relationship in a way that fosters that bonding.  Deepak says that when people are emotionally bonded they are much more effective.
  3. A – AWARENESS.   Be aware of needs and know what’s needed here.  Deepak reminded us there are 7 levels of need from safety to survival to belonging to self-esteem to creative expression to hired consciousness to success.
  4. D – DOING.  Be action-oriented.    If you’re not taking action, then it’s just a dream.  Be a role model for action.  As a tip, Deepak suggests asking your colleagues, “Am I doing what I said i was doing?”  Ask for feedback.  Take calculated risks.  If you’re not going to task risks, then the story remains the same.  According to Deepak, the story only changes when you take calculated risks.
  5. E – EMPOWER YOURSELF.  Empower others.    One of the best ways you can empower others is by noticing their strengths.  Deepak pointed out that according to Gallup research, if you don’t notice their strength, they disengage.   If you criticize them, their disengagement goes up by 20%.  If you ignore them, it goes up by 45%.   If you notice a single strength, disengagement falls to less than 1%.
  6. R – RESPONSIBILITY.  Take initiative.  Take risks.  Above all maintain good health.  Deepak says that .leaders who are really effective are emotionally and physically grounded and stable.  That means getting good sleep, exercising, watching their diet, and they now how to manage stress.
  7. S – SYNCHRONICITY.
more at Sources of Insights…
Deepak Chopra Live

YouTube founders Chad Hurley and Steve Chen buy Delicious from Yahoo

Posted in internet, Media, pioneers, your take on... by aldorf on April 28, 2011

Delicious will become part of Hurley and Chen’s new Internet company AVOS, starting in July 2011. Their goal is to build the best information discovery service.

Gold! 14 Actors Acting – Great Web Special by NYT

Posted in fashion, film, internet, photography by aldorf on April 28, 2011

I know 36 hours are like a month on the internet, and this here is a bit older but a real keeper. Beautiful and intriguing films. From New York Times Magazine Hollywood Issue “14 Actors Acting”. Shot by Solve Sundsbo. The New York Times photography feature has won a Gold Cube for photography at the Art Directors Club global awards held in New York.

The fifteen actors are Javier Bardem (Biutiful), Lesley Manville (Another Year), Jesse Eisenberg (Solitary Man, Holly Rollers, The Social Network), James Franco (127 Hours), Chloë Moretz (Kick-Ass, Let Me In), Jennifer Lawrence (Winter’s Bone), Natalie Portman (Black Swan), Robert Duvall (Get Low), Annette Bening (Mother and Child, The Kids Are All Right), Anthony Mackie (Night Catches Us), Noomi Rapace (The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played With Fire, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest), Tilda Swinton (I Am Love), Matt Damon (Green Zone, Hereafter, True Grit), Vincent Cassel (Mesrine: Killer Instinct, Black Swan), Michael Douglas (Solitary Man, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.

A.O. Scott provides the introduction…

“It goes without saying that acting is a matter of discipline and craft, and that what the best performers do is always subject to analysis, criticism and argument. They say their lines, hit their marks, suffer through retakes and rehearsals, and they trust that an artisanal collaboration with writers, technicians, directors and other actors will somehow yield a work of art. But acting is also an art by itself: alchemical, mysterious, at times almost magical. A person transforms into someone else — a dancer, a Texas Ranger, a wife exiled from her native country, a young vampire, a former militant, a mogul in old age — and in the process reveals something basic and essential that is his or hers alone. In the past, we have invited the year’s great performers to be themselves for the camera and, on video, to talk about what they do. This year, we asked them to do it: to show us — in a few gestures and with a few props but without dialogue or story — what acting is. And here they are, striking some of the classic attitudes of cinema, turning their bodies and faces into instruments of pure, deep and enigmatic emotion. You will, of course, recognize them immediately and admire their grace, daring and skill. But you also may be startled to see how thoroughly themselves they are in the midst of pretending otherwise.”

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